• ambrosia,  music,  poetry

    how to say

    Listen to Glenn’s poem, “How to Say,” set to music by Jeff Enns and sung by Jennifer Enns-Modolo, with Loren Shalanko at the piano:

    How to say
    (May 24, 2009)

    The way to say “I love you” to someone
    is to say “I love you” to that person
    This has come to my attention
    recently
    “I love you” means “I love you”
    and merits
    being said
    to the person
    for whom you feel that love

    Various gestures and clipped phrases
    do not
    actually
    say “I love you”

    As lovely as a home-cooked casserole
    or cheque for some needed money
    or gift certificate for an indulgence
    is
    and is loving, nurturing, caring

    It is not the same as saying
    “I love you”
    it is not

    “Love ya”’ or “You’re my girl”
    or “You’re the best wife, mother, daughter”
    or some Hallmark equivalent
    is
    nice and perhaps true

    But it is not the same as saying
    “I love you”

    Do not mistake a gesture for the
    declaration of love
    nor heavy sentiment for its
    clear articulation

    Do not misjudge the brevity
    of our existence
    in missing the opportunity to say
    “I love you”

    Nor misjudge the simplicity of the
    clear statement
    with empty blathering, over-repetition
    to meaninglessness

    Do not wait until your voice has dried
    and your sunken eyes
    mournfully cry “I love you”

    Do not wait until your deathbed
    or someone else’s

    Do not give expression to love
    in the heat of passion
    nor as an act of contrition

    Like any real gift, give expression
    freely, under no duress,
    with no sense of obligation
    or awkward burden

    Tell all those that you love
    that you love them
    not just your spouse, your lover,
    your beloved

    Tell them now or certainly soon

    Say to each person that you truly love,
    where your mutual love
    is a bond beyond
    the nature of an ordinary relationship,

    “I love you”

    For the only way to do this
    I know
    The only way to say “I love you” to someone
    is to say “I love you”


  • ambrosia,  music,  poetry,  prose

    I am Keats as you are by glenn

    To suggest that Glenn Peirson was indefatigable would be an enormous understatement, for he retained his trademark sense of wry humour to the end of his days. “Please understand,” he wrote a few months prior to his death, “the tall, hooded fellow with the black robe and boney fingers and long sickle isn’t hanging around me. He might be in the other room, but I would just as soon find him and throw him out of the house head first . . . ” And again, just nine weeks prior to his death, he ended a note to family and friends with this marvellous perspective on life and living: “Until we next communicate, we wish you the same revelry in life’s many unsplendoured and often-overlooked day-to-day jewels.”One of Glenn Peirson’s many friends is Howard Dyck, a noted Canadian conductor and former CBC Radio host. He wrote of his accomplished friend: “He was a rare one, was Glenn, a perfect blend of saint, clown, philosopher, pixie, artist, scholar. All of us who were privileged to know him are immeasurably richer for having walked with him.” I am Keats as you are is Glenn Peirson’s parting gift.