• expressionism

    how to say

    Listen to Glenn’s poem, “How to Say,” set to music by Jeff Enns and sung by Jennifer Enns-Modolo, with Loren Shalanko at the piano:

    How to say
    (May 24, 2009)

    The way to say “I love you” to someone
    is to say “I love you” to that person
    This has come to my attention
    recently
    “I love you” means “I love you”
    and merits
    being said
    to the person
    for whom you feel that love

    Various gestures and clipped phrases
    do not
    actually
    say “I love you”

    As lovely as a home-cooked casserole
    or cheque for some needed money
    or gift certificate for an indulgence
    is
    and is loving, nurturing, caring

    It is not the same as saying
    “I love you”
    it is not

    “Love ya”’ or “You’re my girl”
    or “You’re the best wife, mother, daughter”
    or some Hallmark equivalent
    is
    nice and perhaps true

    But it is not the same as saying
    “I love you”

    Do not mistake a gesture for the
    declaration of love
    nor heavy sentiment for its
    clear articulation

    Do not misjudge the brevity
    of our existence
    in missing the opportunity to say
    “I love you”

    Nor misjudge the simplicity of the
    clear statement
    with empty blathering, over-repetition
    to meaninglessness

    Do not wait until your voice has dried
    and your sunken eyes
    mournfully cry “I love you”

    Do not wait until your deathbed
    or someone else’s

    Do not give expression to love
    in the heat of passion
    nor as an act of contrition

    Like any real gift, give expression
    freely, under no duress,
    with no sense of obligation
    or awkward burden

    Tell all those that you love
    that you love them
    not just your spouse, your lover,
    your beloved

    Tell them now or certainly soon

    Say to each person that you truly love,
    where your mutual love
    is a bond beyond
    the nature of an ordinary relationship,

    “I love you”

    For the only way to do this
    I know
    The only way to say “I love you” to someone
    is to say “I love you”


  • expressionism

    assembling a poetry book

    Some words are not for poetry – III
    (
    September 19, 2009)

    Onomatopoetically sung song
    spun beauty as gossamer thread glistening
    I slide down dew-laced air always listening
    to words tinged with heaven’s grace, but strung strong

    Love does come to me, spinning and bathing
    clothing and cradling my soul in its care
    Beauty arises with silk gauze my wear
    dressing, caressing, nudged gently wading

    Into deep pondering life-weaving in awe
    of wonder, surrender to beauty’s great
    latticework frame, which cloaks and sustains us
    translucent, hushed humbly, naked and raw
    Into this beauty we spin without weight
    hosanna-hymn laced with wild gentleness

    [from I am Keats as you are by Glenn Peirson]