soulthoughts

Soulthoughts… maybe you don’t have them. However, it’s more than likely that you do have them. Off and on throughout your life, you’re bound to think, even if briefly, what the cosmos is, what eternity is and if and what the soul might be. I wrote about this briefly in After the Interlude: A Dialogue about Death and Dying:

This moment contains all moments. [C. S. Lewis, on Time]

Inkling:  to have a slight suspicion, a hint, a peek into the obscure or the mystical. I suppose we might define inkling simply as a glimpse.  The word derives from the Middle English verb inkle, to utter under one’s breath.  It’s fair enough, I think, to revive that wonderful old verb and use it as the action we take when we cogitate spiritually.  It may be the most intentional of mystical words.  “I have an inkling.”  “I’m inkling right now—don’t bother me.”  I love the word.  C. S. Lewis and friends—J. R. R. Tolkien and Charles Williams, in particular—named their discussion group “The Inklings.”  They met initially in their rooms at Oxford and later in the pub they called the “Bird and Baby.” It was there that they inkled.  This inkling process created a collective body of thoughts and augmented their stunning capacities to transform shapes into words.  I’ve long had a fascination with this group.  There was no need to impose structure.  Rather, structure was born anew every meeting, arising from the corners of their minds and souls and marching into consciousness as words.  Words are merely the foot soldiers of thought; sometimes, even, the pall bearers.

Perhaps, then, we should look at spiritual inkling as a spiritual action that becomes engaged when we touch upon the numinous atmosphere that’s palpable if we sink far enough into our souls.

the following gives examples of such experts on the soul as Rumi, Plato and Zukav….

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