Zukav,Rumi,Plato

If you haven’t spent much time exploring the soul, I suggest you read through some of the trailblazers’ writings – such as Aristotle, Plato, Socrates, Sophocles and so on. The history of the understanding of the soul is very significant. The Greeks, the Indo-Europeans, the Egyptians – indeed story tellers from the times before Christianity was born, often had the great mysteries and suppositions of the soul persuasively recorded. For some reason, as the philosophies of the world developed, it became easier to believe in the soul as the eternal essence of the person, released at death. Perhaps Truth prevails.

ZUKAV: The Seat Of The Soul thoughts

I have always related strongly to the word “mystic,” but have been unable to relate to any definition of the word until reading “they put their souls and minds on something and reached the extraordinary place where the mind could no longer produce data of the type that they wanted, and they were in the territory of inspiration where their intuitions accelerated and they knew that there was something more than the realm of time and space and matter…they could not necessarily articulate this clearly because they were not equipped to talk about such things…”  That just blew my mind – into excitement and fear and absolute knowledge.

I have also related to something in me needing to be born – and it has been born – and it keeps needing to be born.  This is evident in even my early poetry.  It has left me with that scary feeling of being on the edge of something, like existence.  And Hallelujah!, I read: “this proper vocabulary and means of addressing that which longs to transcend religiosity and spirituality and assume the position of authentic power is longing to be born”.  Let all who know what this means be mid-wives to the vocabulary that is cresting… read the rest in the download below


The Seat of the Soul: 25th Anniversary Edition with a Study Guide
Learn more: https://www.amazon.ca/dp/147675540X/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_m9HuDbJ6NR3G4


 

Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,
there is a field. I'll meet you there.

When the soul lies down in that grass,
the world is too full to talk about.
Ideas, language, even the phrase each other
doesn’t make any sense.

Rumi

Plato believed that the soul was immortal; it was in existence before the body and it continues to exist when the body dies. Plato thought this to be true because of his Theory of Forms. Plato thought we had such ideas as a ‘perfect circle’, not because we have seen one before or that it had been described to us, but the image was already known to us through the world of Forms. This theory also explained how the soul was generated; the soul already lived a life in the world of forms, a world that cannot be destroyed as the body can be destroyed. Once you die, the soul is free for a short time before being entrapped once again in another body. [2] Plato was also a rationalist. He believed that you only have true knowledge and understanding of reality through reason. The physical world is inferior, or course, to the realm of Forms. Any knowledge we have of the physical world is through our senses and is subjective and inexact.

Plato believed that the soul, if it were to be the animator of all living things, must be responsible for a person’s mental or psychological activities and responses. For the soul cannot be the reason for life, yet at the same time limited in its influence over the bodies in which it animates. However this provides one of the most serious and potentially defeating criticisms of Plato’s views on the soul. He fails to address the issue of the interrelationship between body and soul, if they are indeed distinct. He doesn’t mention if the soul act as controller of a lifeless body, or is there more to the body than simply the material. Moreover the argument from affiliation would suggest that the body is concerned with the material, composite world whilst the soul is concerned with the invisible and simple world. If this is the case then the soul cannot, following from Plato’s argument, have any interaction with the material, bodily world; for then it ceases to be simple and immutable.
<i>[Plato’s Views on the Soul, UK essays]</i>]


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