soul: the feather

What does it mean to stay in the moment in my faith, my belief system? Could it be that I am to accept each moment as an expression of my belief system and, therefore, of who I am?

The very odd thing about this is that, if I need a “God Moment,” as my granddaughter calls it, I must not think. That’s no easy thing for a woman who loves to live in her head. But thinking takes me backward and forward and allows no rest, for one idea or concern leads to another and others and … well, you’ve got the proverbial snowball.

And the moment is lost. The mind is a powerful thing.

What is it, then, that you and I must remember if we want to become practitioners of staying in the moment?

First, we must remember, understand and honour that the soul is a powerful, shy, unobtrusive, loving entity. I find the best way to invite the soul into my moments is to “see” it as a feather. Two of my heroines, Hildegard of Bingen and Emily Dickinson, have led me to this visualization as my introduction to staying in the moment.

Hildegard wrote:

Listen ; there was once a king sitting on his throne. Around him stood great and wonderfully beautiful columns ornamented with ivory, bearing the banners of the king with great honour. Then it pleased the king to raise a small feather from the ground and he commanded it to fly. The feather flew, not because of anything in itself, but because the air bore it along. Thus am I ‘a feather on the breath of God.’

And Emily wrote:

“Hope” is the thing with feathers –
That perches in the soul –
And sings the tune without the words –
And never stops – at all –

There is a letting go of all attachments – all attachments – in our being in the moment in our belief system. Let go, take a few very deep breaths and visualize yourself “perched in the soul” and as “a feather on the breath of God.” When you’re finished – and you’ll come to know when the moment suffices, take note of only a few things… colour, the type of feather, the one word you’re left with. Jot these things down in your soul journal. Carry these things in your soul all day. The depth will come.

And that is the simple complexity of being in the moment in your belief system, whether it be atheism (with certain vocabulary changes) or High Anglicanism. For underneath all the “stuff,” we’re all the same.

We’ll meet in our samenesses!

(on the breath of God)


audio – Hildegard of Bingen, sung by Emma Kirkby


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4 Comments

  • ellyn

    HENRY OSWALD PEIRSON
    07/09/2019 AT 23:23

    Being “in the moment” is a huge part of our learning at theatre school. One of the top goals in our acting exercises is to be present as our characters in every moment and to try not to be too far into our heads about what we’re doing. And so to be present we are told to follow our impulses as much as we possibly can, since that’s what we do in real life, yes? (A bit complicated, I know!)

    Similar to what you said, we’re always reminded by our instructors that we may feel when an impulse comes and goes. If we don’t act on said impulse, then it’s best to simply let the moment go and move on to the next impulse that may come. Dwelling on the impulses that could have happened simply don’t allow us to be present. I found your parallels to our learning quite interesting!

    • ellyn

      ELLYN
      15/09/2019 AT 13:45

      This is so interesting and insightful, Henry. It must be very difficult in acting not to be a split personality… rather to learn how to be in the moment and become that other. Perhaps being in the moment allows you to ‘slip’ into the other that you must be and to know them in a very intimate way? Perhaps you come out of it all knowing yourself even better?

  • ellyn

    BRUCE DICKSON
    11/09/2019 AT 16:01
    Hi Ellyn,

    Lovely blog and newsletter. Found the feather reflections helpful. Nice math problem too. 🙂
    Hope to stop in soon to say hello. Blessings always. Bruce

    • ellyn

      15/09/2019 AT 13:41
      It’s good to ‘see’ you this way, too, Bruce. Math is so interesting, huh? So relative and at times imaginary, if we step out of time. Thanks for contributing. Anytime, please. In fact, contribute some writing, please!

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